Home » Archives by category » Psychology news (Page 3)

Eating for hunger or pleasure? Regulating these feeding behaviors involves different brain circuits

Researchers discovered that although the brain regulates feeding for pleasure and for hunger through serotonin-producing neurons in the midbrain, each type of feeding is wired by its own independent circuit that does not influence the other type of fee…

Scientists discover early signs of frontotemporal dementia in personalized cerebral organoids

Frontotemporal dementias are a group of fatal and debilitating brain disorders for which there are no cures. Researchers describe how they were able to recreate much of the damage seen in a widely studied form of the disease by growing special types of…

Brain’s ‘memory center’ needed to recognize image sequences but not single sights

The visual cortex stores and remembers individual images, but when they are grouped into a sequence, mice can’t recognize that without guidance from the hippocampus, according to a new study.

What does a virtual roller coaster ride tell us about migraine?

When experiencing the ups and downs of a virtual roller coaster ride, people who get migraine headaches reported more dizziness and motion sickness than people who do not get migraines, according to a new study.

Neuroscientists posit that brain region is a key locus of learning

Long thought of as a generic alarm system, the locus coeruleus may actually be a sophisticated regulator of learning and behavior, according to a new review.

‘Feel good’ brain messenger can be willfully controlled, new study reveals

Researchers have discovered that spontaneous impulses of dopamine, the neurological messenger known as the brain’s ‘feel good’ chemical, occur in the brain of mice. The study found that mice can willfully manipulate these random dopamine pulses for rew…

How the brain paints the beauty of a landscape

Researchers investigate how our brains proceed from merely seeing a landscape to feeling its aesthetic impact.

Investigational magnetic device shrinks glioblastoma in human test

Researchers shrunk a deadly glioblastoma tumor by more than a third using a helmet generating a noninvasive oscillating magnetic field that the patient wore on his head while administering the therapy in his own home. The 53-year-old patient died from …

Excess coffee: A bitter brew for brain health

It’s a favourite first-order for the day, but while a quick coffee may perk us up, new research shows that too much could be dragging us down, especially when it comes to brain health.

Scientists discover gene therapy provides neuroprotection to prevent glaucoma vision loss

A form of gene therapy protects optic nerve cells and preserves vision in mouse models of glaucoma, according to new research. The findings suggest a way forward for developing neuroprotective therapies for glaucoma, a leading cause of visual impairmen…